Luckily, we have a word for “bollocks”

The Daily Telegraph published a portrait of Duffy today, which contains a real humdinger of Mostpeculiaritis:

Their new home was only 150 miles from Nefyn, but it was in an English-speaking area, and as well as adjusting to a new family and new lifestyle, she also had to cope with speaking a new language. She still finds Welsh, with its more limited vocabulary, more relaxing to speak.

‘In Welsh, you can’t misread anyone. The simplicity of the language means you don’t really get any hidden meaning, any inflections in the words or ambiguity. I became more complicated when I started to take on the English language. I’d spoken and thought in Welsh until I was 11. And suddenly I had to shift.

‘It was a blessing in disguise because I now write my songs in English, and I can engage properly and communicate in English.

(It’s also pretty difficult to sell 6½ million copies of a record if you sing in Welsh.)

There’s so much bad journalism on display in the article (“only 150 miles from Nefyn”, eh? so that’d be “at the opposite end of the country”, then?), that I’m going to go out on a limb and give Duffy the benefit of the doubt, assuming that she’s been misquoted, or at least taken out of context. Because that is a really stupid thing to say in a national newspaper.

[Diolch i ifanmj. If you want to know what the Welsh for “bollocks” is, check out his shortened URL.]

About Nic Dafis

Yn wreiddiol o'r Waun, Wrecsam, bellach yn byw ger Llangrannog, Ceredigion. Gweithio fel tiwtor Cymraeg i oedolion.
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5 Responses to Luckily, we have a word for “bollocks”

  1. Carl Morris says:

    I am looking forward to her Welsh language album in 2023 though.

  2. siantirdu says:

    She does say some strange things. In a radio interview in 2008 she apparently said:

    “I come from this very traditional way of living where nobody ever wins the lottery, nobody ever goes to university or really gets an education in this town that I live in, so the idea of becoming a renowned or well-respected singer, you know?”

    Misquoted or wanting to create a rural myth?

  3. aranjones says:

    Iesgob. Sut mae cam-ddyfynu ‘The simplicity of the language means you don’t really get any hidden meaning, any inflections in the words or ambiguity’?! Ti’n bod yn rhy garedig i’r hogan, ‘rhen foi…:-) Mae hi ‘di lladd ar Nefyn cyn hyn, ers iddi heglu hi – byth wedi cael unrhyw gefnogaeth yno, meddai hi unwaith, oedd yn newyddion i’r bobl oedd yn mynd i’w gigs. Mae fel bod hi’n credu bod neb Cymraeg yn darllen papurau Saesneg.

    Duwcs, byddwn i’n licio rhoid hi mewn stafell efo rhai o’n dysgwyr ni i ddeud wrthyn nhw bod y Gymraeg yn syml!…;-)

  4. Pingback: “No less peculiar” – Jan Morris on Nant Gwrtheyrn | A Most Peculiar People

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